Win a Billabong  Furnace Carbon 5/4mm – Hooded Wetsuit worth £430!

Win a Billabong Furnace Carbon 5/4mm – Hooded Wetsuit worth £430!

ALL Billabong men’s and women’s wetsuits are now made with recycled jerseys, liners and foam, repurposing and saving millions of plastic bottles from oceans and landfills.

“We’ve found some new ways to incorporate even more recycled materials including recycled plastics, scrap lycra and upcycled car tyres.” says Global Wetsuit Director Scott Boot “This is the first time that our entire line reaches a minimum threshold of 80% recycled materials, with some suits as high as 100% recycled materials.”

In addition to Billabong’s commitment to making its entire range of wetsuits with recycled materials, it is also doubling down on the superpower-like properties of Graphene – the lightest, strongest and most heat-conductive material in the world that won a Nobel Prize in 2010. Infused it into the linings of Billabong’s wetsuits it’s been proven in independent studies to heat up faster and retain heat for up to twice as long as traditional thermal liners.

“It seriously feels like you’re surfing in flannel pajamas,” says Billabong team rider and World Surf League star Griffin Colapinto. “I was literally sweating in Alaska even though I was surrounded by icebergs.”

The Billabong Wetsuit Furnace is their warmest, most premium suit with full Graphene lining and Furnace Carbon 5/4mm – Hooded Wetsuit to give away. It is worth £430!

 

To win this wetsuit hit up our Instagram post here

like the post, tag a friend, follow @billabong_europe + share it as a story

We will pick a winner early next week and you will have your suit for winter!

Check out the wetties here > www.billabong.com/wetsuit-guide

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WIN A BILLABONG FURNACE CARBON 5/4MM – HOODED WETSUIT WORTH £430! ALL Billabong men’s and women’s wetsuits are now made with recycled jerseys, liners and foam, repurposing and saving millions of plastic bottles from oceans and landfills. In addition to Billabong’s commitment to making its entire range of wetsuits with recycled materials, it is also doubling down on the superpower-like properties of Graphene – the lightest, strongest and most heat-conductive material in the world that won a Nobel Prize in 2010. Infused it into the linings of Billabong’s wetsuits it’s been proven in independent studies to heat up faster and retain heat for up to twice as long as traditional thermal liners. “It seriously feels like you’re surfing in flannel pajamas,” says Billabong team rider and World Surf League star Griffin Colapinto. “I was literally sweating in Alaska even though I was surrounded by icebergs.” The Billabong Wetsuit Furnace is their warmest, most premium suit with full Graphene lining and Furnace Carbon 5/4mm – Hooded Wetsuit to give away. It is worth £430! To win this wetsuit like this post, tag a friend, follow @billabong_europe + share it as a story We will pick a winner early next week and you will have your suit for winter.

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Sennen Cove

Sennen Cove

Seb Smart surfing over two sessions in Sennen Cove

Never Fear the Cold

Never Fear the Cold

Billabong Adventure division head north to test out the new Graphene wetsuit.

Starting today, 100% of Billabong wetsuits are made from recycled materials.

Billabong proudly offers its new line of premium Graphene-infused wetsuits with a sustainable twist. For the first time ever, ALL Billabong men’s and women’s wetsuits are made with recycled jerseys, liners and foam, repurposing millions of plastic bottles from our oceans and landfills. This is yet another giant leap for the brand whose entire line of boardshorts is made from recycled P.E.T. plastics.

“We’ve been making a lot of progress on this front over the past couple of years,” says Global Wetsuit Director Scott Boot, “but we’ve found some new ways to incorporate even more recycled materials into every style of suit we make. This includes recycled plastics, scrap lycra and upcycled car tires. This is the first time that our entire line reaches a minimum threshold of 80% recycled materials, with some suits as high as 100% recycled materials.”

In addition to Billabong’s commitment to making its entire range of wetsuits with recycled materials, it is also doubling down on the superpower-like properties of Graphene. The lightest, strongest and most heat- conductive material in the world won a Nobel Prize in 2010 and has had a dramatic effect on a wide range of industries, from aeronautics to consumer electronics to apparel. Infused into the linings of Billabong’s wetsuits exclusively for the first time in 2019, it’s been proven in independent studies to heat up faster and retain heat for up to twice as long as traditional thermal liners. “It seriously feels like you’re surfing in flannel pajamas,” says Billabong team rider and World Surf League star Griffin Colapinto. “I was literally sweating in Alaska even though I was surrounded by icebergs.”

The Billabong Wetsuit key styles include the Furnace (their warmest, most premium suit with full Graphene lining), the Revolution/Surf Capsule (a Graphene-paneled suit maximising style, warmth and performance) and the Absolute/Synergy (a Graphene-paneled suit maximizing value and warmth). Each suit offers a variety of thicknesses and built-in hood options, but regardless of what suit you choose, you are guaranteed to pick a suit made from recycled materials. Even better, this is just the beginning of Billabong’s commitment to making a more sustainable, high-performing wetsuit.

Griffin Cola, Tyler Warren, Becca Speak and Eithan Osborne, put their new Billabong Recycler Wetsuits featuring
Graphene to the ultimate test.

Check out the wetties here > www.billabong.com/wetsuit-guide

Carve 204 is coming

Carve 204 is coming

SUBSCRIBE HERE AND GET THE NEXT ISSUE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

On the cover: James Hendy, Padang

James and I go way back to our grom days of Porthtowan and chasing surf comps around UK and Europe with a not so crack team of ‘athletes’. It was pretty bloody funny. All our young lives we were told POMS couldn’t surf, which may have been true in two-foot slop. But in heavier juice in Indo and beyond, everyone in our crew did their best to disprove this myth. In our minds we were repping ourselves, our crew, Cornwall and the UK.
So now we are way down the track and James has found himself running the Padang Cup in Bali. The last comp Padang was pumping, and with a 20-minute break before the final, James tells the crew that he is going out to grab a quick one. I mean, when you’re the boss and it’s your comp, what else are you going do? In return the crew lambast him with usual: “POMS can’t surf.” Unbowed, James borrowed Wilko’s spare board and paddled out in front of the packed cliffs… Banter continues from the channel. A bomb is approaching. James paddles in, takes off, get absolutely slotted, flies into the channel and fires off a double-fingered salute.

So the reason for the cover is this. All his life James chased a dream. He fought against sewage pollution with @surfersagasintsewage, got British and Irish groms sponsored and sent them on amazing trips with RipCurleurope . BUT more importantly when he got the opp, he used his position to pull rank and surf Padang solo. And when that bomb came through he went hard, got pitted and stuck it to the doubters. And if that isn’t reason enough for a cover, I don’t know what is.

This issue is full of addicts: Wales’ finest young competitive surfers, PLD and Logan, who are up at dawn every day and chasing dreams, no matter the conditions. James Hendy, who has always worked to surf, starting sanding surfboards under a tarp, but has ended up living on the Bukit as a surf brand executive. Jack Johns, surf stoked grom who is now a regular Condé Nast cover shooter. Al Mackinnon, whose job is it is to try and encapsulate inspiring surf travel. And of course, the British and Irish surf photographers who capture moments that burn like super novas in the sky maps of our lives.

SURFING IRELANDS COLD GIANT WAVE

SURFING IRELANDS COLD GIANT WAVE

Cold, windy gnarly slabs in Ireland with Nic von Rupp & Francisco Porcella, Andrew Cotton, Jermoe Sayhoun, Barry Mottershead, Tom Lowe, Conor Mcguire